Flying Green with Gulfstream!

Flying Green with Gulfstream!

Gulfstream Aerospace Corp. has been among business aviation’s leaders in sustainability since 2011, when a Gulfstream G450 became the first business jet to cross the Atlantic on sustainable alternative jet fuel (SAJF). Since then, the Savannah, Georgia-based company has taken additional steps to support sustainability, including becoming the first business-jet manufacturer with a dedicated supply of sustainable alternative fuels, which are used by its corporate, demonstration, customer support and flight-test fleet in Savannah. The company’s  aircraft have flown more than 700,000 nautical miles on a blend of SAJF and regular Jet-A, saving more than 750 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

Gulfstream is now elevating its sustainability pledge by using SAJF for completions flights at its facility at Long Beach Airport. In May 2019, it will offer SAJF on a regular basis to all customers at its Long Beach facility, as well. Gulfstream made its first sale of SAJF to a customer in February 2019.

Gulfstream’s sustainability strategy helps support the business aviation industry goals established by the National Business Aviation Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the International Business Aviation Council. In addition to the goal of carbon-neutral growth by 2020, the industry-wide targets include an improvement in fuel-efficiency and a reduction in total carbon dioxide emissions.

Industry awareness and more widespread adoption of SAJF are now a focus of Gulfstream and others in the industry. “Business aviation represents a game-changing market for SAJF,” said Charles Etter, a Gulfstream technical fellow and the company’s head of environmental and regulatory affairs. “Although business aviation is a relatively small contributor to global CO2 emission in aviation, it is vital that we do our part to reduce CO2 emissions. It may very well be that the success of the SAJF market will come through business aviation since we are closer to scale that can be produced in these early stages.”